lundi 6 décembre 2010

A titre d'information

Chers Amis

Nos amis américains continuent régulièrement de tenir leurs séminaires, comme le montre le message suivant, d'Anne McBride :


Hello all,


The December meeting of the Experimental Cuisine Collective will take place on Wednesday, December 15, from 4 to 6 p.m. at 12 Waverly Place (between Mercer and Greene Streets), room 108 (ground floor auditorium). You will need a photo ID to enter the building.



In his talk, "The Science of Chocolate Chip Cookies," Jeff Potter will discuss the variables that impact the properties of chocolate chip cookies. Does hydration time matter? What are the key variables for chewy versus crispy cookies? And why is the chocolate chip cookie more American than apple pie? Using the humble cookie as a starting point, he will explore various tangents---from gluten formation to chocolate polymorphs---to show how food science plays an important role in the kitchen.


Jeff Potter is the author of Cooking for Geeks: Real Science, Great Hacks, and Good Food, which The Washington Post recently called "one of the most useful books on understanding cooking." When he's not thinking about chocolate chip cookies, he works as a software engineer and consults to startups about Internet technologies.


Please RSVP at ecc122010.eventbrite.com. A link is also posted on our website. Please release your seat if you no longer can attend. Thank you. Feel free to bring your copy of Cooking for Geeks if you want it signed.

All my best,

Anne
ABOUT THE EXPERIMENTAL CUISINE COLLECTIVE
The Experimental Cuisine Collective is a working group that assembles scholars, scientists, chefs, writers, journalists, performance artists, and food enthusiasts. We launched in April 2007, as a result of the collaboration of Kent Kirshenbaum of the chemistry department and Amy Bentley of the nutrition, food studies, and public health department at New York University with Chef Will Goldfarb of WillPowder. Our overall aim is to develop a broad-based and rigorous academic approach that employs techniques and approaches from both the humanities and sciences to examine the properties, boundaries, and conventions of food.

Visit the ECC online at www.experimentalcuisine.com.